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Concerts Series

The concert "The Songs of Smyrni" is dedicated to the special Greek music genre called 'Smyrneika', originated in Izmir (minor Asia, Turkey), distinct by the use of different musical instruments, such as Oud and Kanun. 

 

Nataly has created the concert, as she presents her own unique interpretations, and plays oriental percussions (sājāt, Kasik, Tambourine) by her own musical arrangements and conduction, singing in Greek, Turkish, Hebrew and Ladino (Sepharadic).

 

The premier occured at the Tel-Aviv oud festival, at the 'Tzavta' theater, where Nataly hosted Greek singer Thanos Tzanis.

Nataly sings the most beloved songs of the Rebetiko genre ("The Greek Blues" 1880-1950)

In 'Thessaloniki de-Balkan' Nataly focuses on Greek music originated in the Balkans, which is slightly different of Greek music as we know it. 

 

Thessaloniki, "the capital of Greek Macedonia", is the common denominator between the Balkans and Greece and connection to the Jewish community, and is also known as 'Jeursalem of the Balkans'.

 

Natalie sing Greek, Hebrew, Ladino and in Serbo-Croatian (former Yugoslavia) and Gypsy dialect, after collecting

some of the most beloved songs that made ​​their way from the Balkans to Greece, along with Greek songs performed

in traditional Balkan arrangements.

 

Ierushalaym d'Balkan

The story of Jewish Greece

Thessaloniki was known as 'Ierushalaym d'Balkan (Jerusalem of the Balkans) for the enormous contribution given by the Jewish residents to the city's development in all fields, particularly in music and culture.

 

The show gives a lot of emphasis on the contribution of the Jewish residents of Salonika for the development of the music and culture in the city, which later spreaded to the entire country, which is mainly expressed in texts written in Ladino to variations of Popular tunes.

 

Nataly has created a show that tells their story, in which she sings her favorite songs in Greek, Hebrew and Ladino (Sepharadic).